Tuesday Tax Tidbit: Can I Claim My Elderly Parent as a Dependent?

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April 8, 2014 – Back to BlogShare

To deduct up to $3,900 on your 2013 tax return under the adult-dependent exemption, in most cases the parent must have less gross income for the tax year than the exemption amount. Generally Social Security is excluded, but payments from dividends, interest and retirement plans are included.

In addition, you must have contributed more than 50% of your parent’s financial support. If the parent lived with you, the amount of support you claim under the 50% test can include the fair market rental value of part of your residence.

If you shared caregiving duties with a sibling and your combined support exceeded 50%, the exemption can be claimed even though no one individually provided more than 50%. However, only one of you can claim the exemption.

The adult-dependent exemption is just one tax break that you may be able to employ to ease the financial burden of caring for an elderly parent. Contact us for more information on qualifying for this break or others.

Copyright © 2014 Thomson Reuters / BizActions.

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